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Welcome to the Equestrian Outreach Emergency Preperation PageHurricane Charley Photo

Emergency Preparation Overview

(Click here to see a list of Florida’s emergency services, by county)

(Contact Florida Sheriffs Page)

Disaster preparedness is important for all animals, but it takes extra consideration for horses because of their size and their transportation needs. Disasters can happen anywhere and can take many different forms, from barn fires to tornados.  They may necessitate evacuation or an extended stay with no power, water pressure or the ability to renew supplies. If you are required to evacuate it is imperative that you are prepared to move your horses to a safe area. With an effective emergency plan, you may have enough time to move your horses to safety. If you are unprepared or wait until the last minute to evacuate, you could be told by emergency management officials that you must leave your horses behind. Once you leave your property, you have no way of knowing how long you will be kept out of the area. If left behind, your horses could be unattended for days without care, food, or water.  Attached to this page are downloadable emergency prep lists for disaster and fire also an equine first aid kit and Florida’s emergency services by county. What is import here is to start:

Make a plan and work the plan. Post the plan where everyone can see it.

  1. Using the following items and others that you note make a plan.
  2. Once you have a working plan start your preparations now.
  3. Stock piling non perishable supplies.
  4. Stock piling Safety and first aid supplies.
  5. Have regularly scheduled drills for fire and emergency evacuation.
  6. Make sure that everyone who lives, works or boards at your barn is familiar with the plan.
  7. Get to know your neighbors and their animals.
  8. Select a Neighborhood Coordinator who is familiar with your evacuation plan and will be ready to assist should a disaster occur when you are not at home.
  9. Learn to handle your neighbors' animals and identify those which have special handling needs (i.e. stallions).
  10. Post an updated phone list (home, cell and office) of  your veterinarian, your neighbors and anyone who boards at your facility.

(Click here to see to see a downloadable Disaster Emergency Preparation List)

(Click here to see to see a downloadable Barn Fire Emergency Preparation List)

(Click here to see a downloadable Equine First Aid Kit List) (Click Here for a list of First Aid Kit Providers)

(Click here to see a downloadable Barnyard Animal Rescue Plan)

(Click here to see a downloadable Surviival Kit List)

(Click here to see a list of Florida’s emergency services, by county)